Posts Tagged ‘Politics’

FLASHBACK – The Chicano Moratorium of 1970

chicanoOn August 29, 1970, the Chicano Moratorium against the war in Vietnam was held in East L.A.

Loyola-Marymount film student Tom Myrdahl shot this documentary, capturing the events that unfolded as law enforcement and protesters clashed in and around Laguna Park. This film has not been seen in nearly 40 years. Tom, who is still a working cameraman in Los Angeles, is putting this historic film on the web as a tribute to the brave citizens of East L.A. who came together 40 years ago to voice their dissent against the Vietnam War.

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=famNeiosTVk[/youtube]


SERIES – On Skid Row: Part Five, Afterword

PART 5 OF 5 (With follow-ups to come) For full series, click here.skidrow

I’d like to thank everyone who’s made such a point to tell me that by watching this film series, their perceptions of homelessness in Los Angeles has really been altered. Over and over again I’ve heard: “Seeing the series made me want to help. I just don’t know how.” The films affected me the same way, which is why I chose to embed them.
I’m currently in contact with Sam Slovick and we’re trying to brainstorm ideas for how we can harness the collective power of our huge HiddenLA audience to make a difference and help get some of these parents and children off of our streets. Please keep an eye out, because as soon as we come up with a good gameplan for what would truly help the situation, we’ll be announcing it.

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Los Angeles’ homeless community isn’t exactly hidden, yet poverty is a particularly easy issue to ignore as we go about our busy days, driving through the city streets at high speeds worrying about our own problems. I hope you’ll stop and take a minute to watch these short films from 2008. Especially in this economy, there but by the grace of God go us all.

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SERIES – On Skid Row: Part Four, God

PART 4 OF 5 – For full series, click here.skidrow

Los Angeles’ homeless community isn’t exactly hidden, yet poverty is a particularly easy issue to ignore as we go about our busy days, driving through the city streets at high speeds worrying about our own problems. I hope you’ll stop and take a minute to watch these short films from 2008. Especially in this economy, there but by the grace of God go us all.

Journalist Sam Slovick posted a comment for us after we featured part one on HiddenLA:

“Thanks for posting my skid row doc series. Sadly not a lot has changed since I made it. I’m about to shoot another as a companion piece to a story for the launch of the new SLAKE magazine. This one will consider home as an internal condition, as apposed to a geography through the lens of some decidedly disenfranchised people who have found themselves fallen deep between the cracks on skid row in L.A.”

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGV_FpKP2ro&feature=channel[/youtube]

DESCRIPTION: Part 4: Union Rescue Mission’s Orland Ward and Skid Row preacher Pastor Jeffery Thomas reveal the role of God on Skid Row. Alongside Skid Row’s hustlers, transients, and cops are a lesser known population of children, social servants and religious workers whose daily lives play out on LA’s most dangerous city blocks.

Note: We really love to hear what you have to say here. Just know that inappropriate, rude shout out comments will not be approved… you should post those on You Tube.


SERIES – On Skid Row: Part Three, Drugs

PART 3 OF 5 – For full series, click here.skidrow

Los Angeles’ homeless community isn’t exactly hidden, yet poverty is a particularly easy issue to ignore as we go about our busy days, driving through the city streets at high speeds worrying about our own problems. I hope you’ll stop and take a minute to watch these short films from 2008. Especially in this economy, there but by the grace of God go us all.

Journalist Sam Slovick posted a comment for us after we featured part one on HiddenLA:

“Thanks for posting my skid row doc series. Sadly not a lot has changed since I made it. I’m about to shoot another as a companion piece to a story for the launch of the new SLAKE magazine. This one will consider home as an internal condition, as apposed to a geography through the lens of some decidedly disenfranchised people who have found themselves fallen deep between the cracks on skid row in L.A.”

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbxm5sCXZ_Y[/youtube]

DESCRIPTION: Part 3: Two sides of the same coin: Super Dope cop, Commander Andrew Smith from Central Division lays down the law, plus former Skid Row crack dealers, gutter rappers Choc Nitty and Six Reasons from the infamous Snowman Cliq, come correct. Alongside Skid Row’s hustlers, transients, and cops are a lesser known population of children, social servants and religious workers whose daily lives play out on LA’s most dangerous city blocks.


SERIES – On Skid Row: Part Two, Kids

PART 2 OF 5 – For full series, click here.skidrow

Los Angeles’ homeless community isn’t exactly hidden, yet poverty is a particularly easy issue to ignore as we go about our busy days, driving through the city streets at high speeds worrying about our own problems. I hope you’ll stop and take a minute to watch these short films from 2008. Especially in this economy, there but by the grace of God go us all.

Journalist Sam Slovick posted a comment for us after we featured part one on HiddenLA:

“Thanks for posting my skid row doc series. Sadly not a lot has changed since I made it. I’m about to shoot another as a companion piece to a story for the launch of the new SLAKE magazine. This one will consider home as an internal condition, as apposed to a geography through the lens of some decidedly disenfranchised people who have found themselves fallen deep between the cracks on skid row in L.A.”

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=karPGdnqljE[/youtube]

DESCRIPTION: Part 2: Teenaged Skid Row filmmaker Franklin Arburtha carries the mantle of disenfranchised youth on skid row. Alongside Skid Row’s hustlers, transients, and cops are a lesser known population of children, social servants and religious workers whose daily lives play out on LA’s most dangerous city blocks.


FLASHBACK – Forced Integration in L.A.

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wra-krMEvlU[/youtube]
September 1970 “This news clip from 1970 focuses on the start of desegregation-via-busing in the Pasadena school district and the signing of an anti-busing bill by California Gov. Ronald Reagan. A much larger controversy later surrounded busing in the Los Angeles Unified School District, since that district covered many more students. Busing in L.A. and elsewhere in California was largely halted by litigation and the passage of a ballot initiative in the early 1980s.

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvJrNYiiuq0[/youtube]
October 1980 Litigation to order a busing plan for the Los Angeles Unified School District began in the 1960s and a plan was ultimately ordered by Judge Paul Egly in the late 1970s. This news report focuses on “white flight” from the District. Proposition 1 of 1979 was a reaction to the busing plan and limited the scope of busing. After several years of litigation, Prop 1 was upheld and the plan ended. The video shows a sign denouncing Judge Egly.”


PART 3 – Robert Kennedy

SERIES: Visions of the Ambassador

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OG4vJxi9Kis[/youtube]
[youtube width=”300″ height=”300″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmc2EzkRDkI[/youtube]
On June 4th, 1968, Robert Kennedy was confident he had just clinched the Democratic primary. He was set to be the next President of the United States, and with his leadership would come change. Kennedy was one of the first leaders of his stature and background to forcefully inspire and include people of all ages and colors, his goal being to create a better nation that would stand together and end racial and economic injustice. Having together witnessed the losses of Kennedy’s brother and Martin Luther King, Jr., many Americans recognized and embraced his urgent passion as genuine, and saw his dreams of change as their own.

Although Bobby Kennedy was staying on the fifth floor of the (now renovated) Sportsman’s Lodge, his political base in Los Angeles was the Royal Suite in the Ambassador Hotel. Kennedy’s last speech was held in the Ambassador’s Embassy Room, and he was fatally shot as he exited through the kitchen.

The first video above was taken from the funeral train which carried Kennedy’s body. Along the entire path of the train’s journey, Americans from every imaginable walk of life gathered together along the tracks to say goodbye to the man who had embodied their hopes and dreams… and was taken from them.

After the jump, photos of the man convicted for the murder of Bobby Kennedy, Sirhan Sirhan, then and in 2008. (Click on thumbnails for larger views.) (more…)


ONGOING – A President Named Barry

Young Obama What: Lisa Jack Photography Exhibit: Barack Obama: The Freshman
When:
Until July 18, Tuesdays–Saturdays (10am–6pm)
Where:
M+B Gallery 612 N Almont Dr, WeHo (310) 550-0050
Price:
FREEEEE!
Details: (more…)