Posts Tagged ‘Literature’

MATINEE – Raymond Chandler’s Los Angeles

After the jump, a really great 30 minute long documentary (shown in 3 parts) about iconic author Raymond Chandler‘s take on the corruption of Los Angeles in the 1930s… a paradise infiltrated by dope fiends, smut peddlers, schemers in low places and high, crooked cops and crooked politicians…
[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zDqrSctpVw[/youtube]

Raymond ChandlerAnd here’s something you might not have known… I’ll bet you’ve passed The Cahuenga Building in Hollywood a million times and not thought twice about it… but the six-story structure erected by John and Donald Parkinson (they also built Bullock’s Wilshire and the Santa Monica City Hall) was once the tallest building on the Boulevard and the high-profile home for L.A.’s best-known fictional private detective. Cynical gumshoe Philip Marlowe‘s office was located on the top floor in Suite #615 and it’s for this very reason that the building’s intersection was officially named after his creator, author Raymond Chandler. Interested in checking the building out? Well you’ll soon be able to spend the night… it’s currently being turned into a boutique hotel.

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EVENT – L.A. Noir with LAPD Chief William Bratton

LA NoirWHAT: Los Angeles Magazine and Writer’s Bloc literary culture series presents John Buntin in conversation with LAPD Chief Bill Bratton
WHERE: The Writer’s Guild Theatre, 135 South Doheny, Beverly Hills
WHEN: Monday, Sept. 21, 7:30pm 
PRICE: $20. Reservations required. Make a reservation via e-mail

DETAILS: Urban historian John Buntin writes a thrilling and gripping narrative about the relationship between Jewish mobster Mickey Cohen and LAPD Chief William Parker in the 50’s. His book, L.A. Noir: The Struggle for the Soul of America’s Most Seductive City, is as exciting a cops and robbers book about Los Angeles you’ll read, and it’s nonfiction. Chief Bratton loved it so much that he’ll chat with author John Buntin and do the post-mortem himself.


RESOURCE – Specialty Book Stores

book cat It’s an understatement to say that by nature I’m a bit of a book addict. While many people may think it’s fun to joke that the residents of Los Angeles don’t even know *how* to read, you and I both know that there are a gazillion absolutely incredible places for bibliophiles to get their book fix in this town. After the jump is a listing of some of the most unique *specialty* book stores to be found in Los Angeles. Whether you’re looking for the latest in Armenian fiction or a manual on how to meet code when building a home, if these vendors don’t have the topic you’re looking for in stock, they can probably point you towards someone who might.

*If you notice any errors or would like to suggest a beloved shop that we’ve missed, please e-mail us.*

TRAVEL
Geographica – Travel, Toluca Lake (818) 848-1414
Distant Lands – Travel, Pasadena (626) 449-3220
Traveler’s Bookcase
– Travel, 3rd Street (323) 655-0114

HOBBIES
Autobooks-Aerobooks – Aviation and Automobiles, Burbank (818) 845-0707
Janet Jarvits Bookseller – Cooking, Pasadena (626) 296-1638
The Cook’s Library (it’s still open!) – Cooking, West LA (323) 655-3141
Hollywood Magic Inc – Magic, Hollywood (323) 464-5610

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FOCUS – Your Inner Bukowski

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVn9qUz3W94[/youtube] I’ve been noticing lately that people seem a bit weary right now. Just kind of… holding on and trying to keep their heads up until the tide turns. Los Angeles is a city with a bit of a manic depressive personality, so when times are hard (riots, earthquakes, fires, floods, unemployment, bad breakup, whatever) usually it’s easy to just look up at the sun and think, “Yeah, my life kinda sucks right now… but look at this weather! Tomorrow will be better!” Lately even the best of us seem to be struggling and feeling a bit down for an extended time, though. We’re all a little bummed that Obama hasn’t filled our lives with rainbows and butterflies yet.

Now I’m one of those annoying people who likes to focus on the good, but sometimes that’s a lot of work during times like these. What to do, what to do. (more…)