Posts Tagged ‘1930s’

FLASHBACK – The Exuberant Zest of WW2 SoCal

I’m not sure how many of the Japanese Americans who were relocated into local internment camps (or their descendants) would’ve considered it a “minor incident” of World War 2… but hey, those people could write their own dagnabbed newsreels! Um, or not.

“This video (part two, which focuses on local character, is after the jump) looks at what the future might be for California after World War II ends. Would there be enough jobs given the rapid population growth that was occurring? What industries might take up the slack when military spending ended? The post-WW2 Cold War was not foreseen. References are made to opportunities for trade with Russia and China. Nuclear energy – surprisingly – is seen as an alternative to hydro (and this is before Hiroshima.) The movie industry is recognized as important for the future. References are made to prewar social movements such as EPIC and the Ham & Eggs pension scheme and religious movements.”

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J58jg9jWvsA[/youtube] (more…)


MATINEE – Raymond Chandler’s Los Angeles

After the jump, a really great 30 minute long documentary (shown in 3 parts) about iconic author Raymond Chandler‘s take on the corruption of Los Angeles in the 1930s… a paradise infiltrated by dope fiends, smut peddlers, schemers in low places and high, crooked cops and crooked politicians…
[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zDqrSctpVw[/youtube]

Raymond ChandlerAnd here’s something you might not have known… I’ll bet you’ve passed The Cahuenga Building in Hollywood a million times and not thought twice about it… but the six-story structure erected by John and Donald Parkinson (they also built Bullock’s Wilshire and the Santa Monica City Hall) was once the tallest building on the Boulevard and the high-profile home for L.A.’s best-known fictional private detective. Cynical gumshoe Philip Marlowe‘s office was located on the top floor in Suite #615 and it’s for this very reason that the building’s intersection was officially named after his creator, author Raymond Chandler. Interested in checking the building out? Well you’ll soon be able to spend the night… it’s currently being turned into a boutique hotel.

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PART 2 – The Ambassador Hotel All-Stars

SERIES: Visions of the Ambassador

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIPrZzStLxg[/youtube]
click for larger viewDuring the roaring 20s and 30s, the Ambassador Hotel’s nightclub “house bands” quickly became the most popular orchestras in the world. An issue of (the then-popular and catchy-named) Talking Machine World magazine identified Abe Lyman’s California Ambassador Orchestra (see video clip above) as “Los Angeles’ most famous popular musical organization” in 1923.

Abe Lyman (August 4, 1897 – October 23, 1957) was a popular bandleader from the 1920s to the 1940s. He made recordings, appeared in films and provided the music for numerous radio shows, including Your Hit Parade… For an engagement at the Cocoanut Grove in The Ambassador Hotel on April 1, 1922, Abe added a violinist and saxophonist. Opening night drew a large crowd of 1500 guests in the Cocoanut Grove, plus another 500 more outside.”

For a five year run in the 30s, a dapper group of musicians known as Gus Arnheim’s Orchestra (see video below) was then stationed at the Cocoanut Grove and widely considered to be the most popular band on the West coast. In 1930, the band began to feature male singing trio The Rhythm Boys, featuring a young singer named Bing Crosby. Arnheim Orchestra alumni also included Stan Kenton, Russ Columbo (seen playing violin and singing in the middle of the trio in the clip below), Charlie Spivak, Woody Herman, and actor Fred McMurray (on saxophone).
[dailymotion width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1u2m8_gus-arnheim-and-his-ambassadors1929_music[/dailymotion]


IMAGERY – Fishing in Azusa, October 1930

I really love these photos. Click on the images for a larger view.

Photograph of Jewell Teegardin fishing on a rock above the falls and Beatrice Williams fishing in the foreground, Rainbow Angling Club, Azusa, October 1930. Both women can be seen wearing knee-high laced-up boots, breeches, and sleeveless collared shirts. They hold fishing poles and have baskets slung over their shoulders.

azusa_fishing
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FLASHBACK – Olvera Street circa 1937

[youtube width=”590″ height=”420″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50DnilLc7x0[/youtube]


LOCAL – L.A. Nature Lovers

[googlevideo]http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2099984916464728483[/googlevideo] At left is a silent video (circa 1930s) taken by the NATURE FRIENDS LOS ANGELES, headquartered in Sierra Madre.

Their umbrella organization was originally founded in Austria in 1895 as Naturfreunde, a non-profit Alpine social club formed to promote tourism with a minimal effect on the environment (an early version of eco-tourism), international friendship and understanding. The Los Angeles branch was opened in 1920. The club is still active and membership is very affordable. In order to join you need to be sponsored and recommended by two members, but if you are a nice person who’s really “interested in nature, conservation, hiking and the outdoors” I’m sure they’d probably befriend you. Maybe you could see about joining them for movie night on Saturday, July 25th and introduce yourself.

This (again, silent) video captures images of:
• The club’s weekend activities at their lodge in Sierra Madre;
• Construction of a cabin in the San Jacinto Mountains;
• Outings to the Coachella Valley desert;
• A beach party near Corona del Mar in Orange County;
• Skiing at Big Pines;
• Driving through Angeles Crest;

• Hiking to San Gabriel Peak… and other vintage L.A. nature-lovin’ stuff. :)